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A wild month at the Canada 2015 Women's World Cup

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Avry Lewis-McDougall spent a month traveling around Canada to cover the Women's World Cup. He writes his experiences for Waking The Red.

Matt Kryger-USA TODAY Sports

As the cleaning crews at BC Place began sweeping up the confetti and moving the stage off of the pitch I wondered to myself as I stood near one of the seats before planning my exit after the USA claimed their third World Cup title "Is it really over?".

It's been just over a week since the end of the Women's World Cup with the US easily handling Japan 5-2 in a final that I don't think any of us saw coming. The Americans were a well oiled machine in this one thanks to a hat trick from Carli Lloyd and two other goals from Lauren Holliday and Tobin Heath.

What was so truly amazing about that was how Japan when playing from behind struggled to make anything happen save for the two goals that beat Hope Solo when this match was already essentially decided.

This match may also have well have been a home game for the Americans, I made it into Vancouver that morning and from the minute I stepped off of the plane you could tell that the red, white and blue were going to have an incredible advantage.

Walking up and down Nelson and Granville all I saw was the American flag as far as the eye could see. It took me quite a few hours to find my first batch of Japanese fans and they were fired up but were outnumbered by about 100 to 1 anywhere near BC Place.

Oh and let's not forget that the fans rocking the Abby Wambach, Alex Morgan and Solo jerseys were incredibly loud with their "I Believe that We Will Win" chant, something that may be stuck in my head for the next six months.

I've heard crowds get loud but for a team not playing on home soil I've never heard an ovation as loud as when the US made their way onto the pitch for warm ups inside of a dome, the vast majority of the over 53 thousand strong on hand let it be known who they were siding with over 30 minutes before this one got underway.

This tournament was also a massive success for Fox Sports 1 and ratings wise the final did something spectacular. The final ratings numbers had the final drawing over 26 million viewers making it the most watched soccer match in US TV history.

That's right, this final had a bigger audience than the 1999 Women's final and any of the men's Team USA matches.

To say the people love the women's game is  a massive, massive understatement.

Canada may not have been the ones standing at the end of it holding the trophy over their heads but this tournament was still a tremendous success in Canada. The home side had their best finish since the 2003 event.

Even though they deserved a better fate than the one that was handed to them in the quarterfinals vs England and young players like Ashley Lawrence and Kadeisha Buchanan showed that they will the be leaders for a new era of this national team. attended games in all six cities.

The fan bases in Vancouver and Edmonton stood up strong especially, and I can admit for much of the tournament I was incredibly harsh on Montreal for having a low turn out for of a few of the group stage matches. But over 40,000 fans did show up for Canada's game against Holland in Group A play and it was packed once again for the semi final match between the US and Germany.

This World Cup may have been one of the most surprising of all time as well, who at the start of this would have called England finishing in third? Brazil being knocked out in the round of 16 by Australia?

The tournament in four years may be going to France but I have a feeling that with the reception it got during it's first trip to the Great White North we may see it's return in the near future, and maybe a little more magic from Canada in front of the die hard fans.

For me this was my first time covering a senior level FIFA event and the experience was something that I'll never forget. I hope to cover many more Wold Cups and hopefully in many more aspects this continues to grow because it has taken astronomical leaps and bounds since the first one in China back in 1991. The beautiful game delivered again.